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    • Wed, May 10, 2017
    • 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
    • William Reif Gallery

    The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende 

    In 1939, as Poland falls under the shadow of the Nazis, young Alma Belasco’s parents send her away to live with a wealthy aunt and uncle in their mansion in San Francisco. There, as the rest of the world goes to war, she encounters Ichimei Fukuda, the quiet and gentle son of the family’s Japanese gardener. Unnoticed by those around them, a tender love affair begins to blossom. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the two are cruelly pulled apart as Ichimei and his family—like thousands of other Japanese Americans—are declared enemies and forcibly relocated to internment camps run by the United States government. Throughout their lifetimes, Alma and Ichimei reunite again and again, but theirs is a love that they are forever forced to hide from the world.


    • Wed, June 14, 2017
    • 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
    • William Reif Gallery

    My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

    Dealing with small-town women, who are always more complicated than they seem and often less likable than many contemporary heroines, Strout tells the story of a thirty-something wife and mother who is in the hospital for longer than she expected, recovering from an operation. She’s not dying, but her situation is serious enough that her mother--whom she has not seen in many years--arrives at her bedside. The two begin to talk. Their style is undramatic, gentle--just the simple unspooling of memories between women not generally given to sharing them and an accumulation of detail and repetitive themes of longing and lifelong missed connections. 


    • Wed, July 12, 2017
    • 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
    • William Reif Gallery

    The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah

    With courage, grace and powerful insight, bestselling author Kristin Hannah captures the epic panorama of WWII and illuminates an intimate part of history seldom seen: the women's war. The Nightingale tells the stories of two sisters, separated by years and experience, by ideals, passion and circumstance, each embarking on her own dangerous path toward survival, love, and freedom in German-occupied, war-torn France—in a novel that celebrates the resilience of the human spirit and the durability of women. 


    • Wed, August 09, 2017
    • 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
    • William Reif Gallery

    My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry 
    by Fredrik Backman

    Elsa is seven years old and different. Her grandmother is seventy-seven years old and crazy—as in standing-on-the-balcony-firing-paintball-guns-at-strangers crazy. She is also Elsa’s best, and only, friend. At night Elsa takes refuge in her grandmother’s stories, in the Land-of-Almost-Awake and the Kingdom of Miamas, where everybody is different and nobody needs to be normal. When Elsa’s grandmother dies and leaves behind a series of letters apologizing to people she has wronged, Elsa’s greatest adventure begins. Her grandmother’s instructions lead her to an apartment building full of drunks, monsters, attack dogs, and old crones but also to the truth about fairy tales and kingdoms and a grandmother like no other. 



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